Fact Check >> Can Low-Calorie Foods Help you Lose Weight?

Low-calorie foods are flourishing: cold cuts, milk, cheese, granola bars, soft beverages, salted treats– there are “light” variations of all these foods and many more. Do these “low-calorie” items actually provide what they promise?What are “light” foods?Wherever it says “light,” it suggests there is less of something: for example, less fat or less or no sugar. A “100% fat-free” claim can only be made for foods that meet the requirements for “fat-free” and likewise have less than 0.5 grams of fat per 100 grams and contain no added fat.Cholesterol-free: less than 2 milligrams of cholesterol for an offered serving size and 2 grams or less of saturated fat for a provided serving sizeSaturated fat-free: no more than 0.5 grams saturated fat per serving size, and no more than 0.5 grams of trans fatty acidsLow-fat: 3 grams or less of overall fat per serving size Low-calorie: 40 calories or less for a provided serving size (except sugar alternatives) Low-cholesterol: up to 20 milligrams cholesterol and 2 grams or less of saturated fat for an offered serving sizeLow-saturated fat: 1 gram or less of saturated fat per serving size and no more than 15% of calories from saturated fat * The serving size represents the quantity of food usually taken in per eating occasion.Source: https://caloriecontrol.org/what-the-labels-mean/How does “light” impact taste?Fat is an essential taste carrier because it takes in and maintains flavors. Many of these substances can cause headaches, diarrhea, polyuria or even allergic reactions.Are light or low-calorie foods unhealthy?More research is required in order to clearly identify whether and how “light” foods affect our health.

Do these “low-calorie” products really deliver what they promise?What are “light” foods?Wherever it says “light,” it implies there is less of something: for example, less fat or less or no sugar. A “100% fat-free” claim can just be made for foods that satisfy the criteria for “fat-free” and likewise have less than 0.5 grams of fat per 100 grams and include no added fat.Cholesterol-free: less than 2 milligrams of cholesterol for an offered serving size and 2 grams or less of saturated fat for a given serving sizeSaturated fat-free: no more than 0.5 grams saturated fat per serving size, and no more than 0.5 grams of trans fatty acidsLow-fat: 3 grams or less of overall fat per serving size Low-calorie: 40 calories or less for a provided serving size (other than sugar alternatives) Low-cholesterol: up to 20 milligrams cholesterol and 2 grams or less of saturated fat for a given serving sizeLow-saturated fat: 1 gram or less of saturated fat per serving size and no more than 15% of calories from saturated fat * The serving size represents the amount of food usually consumed per eating occasion.Source: https://caloriecontrol.org/what-the-labels-mean/How does “light” affect taste?Fat is a crucial taste provider because it soaks up and maintains flavors. Many of these compounds can cause headaches, diarrhea, polyuria or even allergic reactions.Are light or low-calorie foods unhealthy?More research study is required in order to plainly identify whether and how “light” foods affect our health.

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