Heart-Rate Accuracy Revisited

Ive gotten some odd results, especially when working out at higher heart rates, from my Whoop strap: it can offer what appears to be spurious high heart readings. It is especially bad when doing workout with moving arms, like utilizing my kayak trainer or strolling with hand weights. It even occurs while cycling. I had this issue in the past with wrist-based heart rate measurements (with a Fitbit). Its quite crucial for me, as somebody who had Afib in the past, to keep an eye on HR properly. I purchased a Polar H9 chest strap, which is extremely regarded for accuracy. This was a low-cost solution at $55. There is a free app “Polar Beat” that couple with the strap, and turns your phone into a fitness tracker, using both GPS and heart rate. I used that to compare vs. the readings from my Whoop.

This first is a basic 5 minute simple spin on my recumbent stationery bike fitness instructor. Max HR is 104, but Whoop reveals a spurious spilke to 130 BPM:

This is about 50 Minute strolling with hand weights, so arms swinging about waist high. WHOOP has lots of spurious variation, and overpredicts Max HR by 39 beats:

Ive done several test given that and the results are comparable: the Whoop frequently tosses in spurious spikes to high heart rate, even while cycling. And these just cant be trusted since they are based on heart rate. For a great example of how spuriously high heart rate readings can be misleading, consider the last paragraph of this previous post, where I went for a long comfy bike ride but was misinformed into thinking I had gone too hard.

I will continue to utilize the Whoop up until December due to the fact that Im prepaid for this year, and I wish to continue keeping track of to see if my heart rate variability keeps enhancing in time, which is a good indication my training benefits my health. After that Ill change to a more affordable alternative (see listed below).

And for keeping an eye on the strength of my training, I more than happy to now have my new strap and Polar Beat App.

Affordable Alternative for Monitoring Heart Rate Variability and Recovery- Hrv4Training

Just recently I found the website Hrv4Training. They have an app for keeping track of heart rate variability, all you require is a mobile phone, with a one-time expense of $12. Hrv4Training was founded by Dr. Marco Altini, who has a PhD and 2 MS degrees in appropriate fields and has actually released extensively on heart rate variability in the peer-reviewed literature. So the science behind the website and the app is sound. Likewise, the accuracy of the apps results has actually been verified vs Electrocardiogram techniques. Exceptionally, all that is needed is putting your finger over the smart devices electronic camera. Heart rate and HRV are then determined with the camera with a method called “Photoplethysmography” (quite a tongue twister). If you have another way to measure HR like a chest strap, the app accepts that. I linked my Polar strap to the Hrv4Training app. For the recently and a half Ive been comparing its outcomes with Whoop. Due to the fact that the proprietary algorithm used by Whoop for computing HRV varies from that used by Hrv4Training, the exact worths can not be compared straight. The trends concur very well: On days when one app states “youre healing is great, you can go hard today”, or “youre recovery is bad, take it simple today”, the other agrees. So Im now positive I can continue on with the Hrv4Training app after my Whoop membership ends. The combination of healing info from Hrv4Training and training strength from Polar Beat will tell me all I need to know.

They utilize the unreliable formula 220-age to estimate max heart rate. They then use that to provide feedback on what zone you are training in, which can be highly misleading.
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Released by bionicOldGuy

Ive gotten some odd outcomes, particularly when working out at greater heart rates, from my Whoop strap: it can offer what appears to be spurious high heart readings. There is a totally free app “Polar Beat” that sets with the strap, and turns your phone into a fitness tracker, utilizing both GPS and heart rate. Ive done numerous test considering that and the results are comparable: the Whoop often tosses in spurious spikes to high heart rate, even while bicycling. They have an app for keeping an eye on heart rate variability, all you need is a wise phone, with a one-time expense of $12. They utilize the inaccurate formula 220-age to estimate max heart rate.

I likewise have a long-lasting interest in outdoor activities and physical fitness. I have had both hips replaced and a heart valve replacement due to a hereditary condition.
View all posts by bionicOldGuy

Published
March 3, 2021

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